This Is What a Coronavirus Lockdown Means in Each State

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As the number of coronavirus cases soars across the United States, state officials are racing to curtail the pandemic by taking extraordinary measures—including forcing millions of Americans to remain in their homes in the name of social distancing.

The White House extended its social distancing guidelines on March 31 for another 30 days and said the worst was yet to come. In a best case scenario, with lockdown guidelines followed “perfectly” across the country, the national death toll could reach between 100,000 to 200,000, the White House coronavirus task force said. “This is done community by community,” task force leader Dr. Deborah Birx said. “We’re very dependent on each person in the United States… following the presidential guideline to a tee.”

Restaurants, bars, and schools across the United States have been shuttered and residents have been ordered to stay home in a desperate effort to “flatten the curve.” Here’s a list of state lockdowns, and what they actually mean.

NEW YORK

New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo announced a statewide “stay at home” order on March 20, warning New York state’s 19 million residents that those who defy the expansive edict could face civil fines. “When I talk about the most drastic action we can take, this is the most drastic action we can take,” Cuomo said.

The restrictions took effect the night of March 22 and stipulate:

  • All New Yorkers are ordered to work from home.
  • Employees in essential jobs and government personnel can continue to work.
  • Solitary walks and outdoor exercise is permitted but all team sports are banned.
  • Residents are allowed to go to the grocery store and run errands.
  • Restaurants and bars can still deliver to homes.
  • All non-essential businesses statewide must close their premises.
  • Liquor and wine stores are classified as essential so can stay open, as can pharmacies, grocery stores, and restaurants and bars offering takeout and delivery only.
  • Mass transit and roadways are not affected.

TEXAS

Texas Governor Greg Abbott issued an executive order March 31 that all businesses except "essential services" should close until May 4. He resisted describing his directive as a shelter-in-place or stay-at-home order, according to the Dallas Morning News, but the advisories are largely the same as shelter-in-place orders issued around the country. Hospital associations have criticized Abbott as moving too late and predicted that COVID-19 could overwhelm the state's medical capacity in late April.

A judge in North Texas had issued an order declaring all businesses in his county essential on March 24, the Morning News reports. He rescinded it following the governor's order.

  • Bars, gyms, salons, and restaurant dining areas will remain closed, as they were before the order.
  • Visits to nursing homes are prohibited
  • "Essential services" include healthcare businesses, gas stations, grocery stores, banks, utilities, firearm sellers, childcare for employees of essential businesses, and government functions.
  • Church services are also exempted from the order, mirroring exceptions made in Florida but at odds with some county-level restrictions in Texas that require congregations meet remotely.
  • “Essential activities” include grocery shopping, picking up medication, and taking walks. Hunting and fishing continue to be allowed. Texans are advised to adhere to social distancing guidelines until April 30.

CALIFORNIA

California Gov. Gavin Newsom announced a statewide “stay at home” order on March 19, stating that while “home isolation” is not his preference, it’s necessary to stop the spread of the virus. The city of Los Angeles issued a similar citywide mandate.

While Newson stated that California police will not be actively enforcing the order, the mandate states that failure to comply could result in “a misdemeanor punishable by a fine, imprisonment, or both.”

“This is not a permanent state, this is a moment in time,” Newsom said. “We will look at these kinds of decisions as pivotal decisions.”

The order states:

  • Residents are allowed to run errands to the grocery store and pharmacy.
  • Walks outside are permitted while practicing social distancing.
  • Employees in essential jobs can continue to work outside the house.
  • All other Californians must work from home for the time being.
  • Restaurants can deliver to homes.

ILLINOIS

Illinois Gov. J.B. Pritzker on March 20 ordered a statewide “stay-at-home” order, saying that while he “didn’t come to this decision lightly,” he believed the aggressive action was necessary to contain the coronavirus spread after speaking with medical experts and mathematicians.

“For the vast majority of you already taking precautions, your lives will not change very much,” Pritzker said.“We don’t know yet all the steps we’re going to have to take to get this virus under control.”

The order, which began at 5 p.m. on March 21 and will continue through April 7, states:

  • All residents must work from home, except for essential personnel.
  • Residents may go to the grocery store, pharmacy, and put gas in their cars.
  • Walks outside are allowed but must follow social distancing guidelines.
  • All non-essential businesses are shut down.
  • Restaurants can still deliver to homes.
  • All roads remain open.
  • Grocery stores, pharmacies, and gas stations remain open.

OHIO

Ohio Gov. Mike DeWine announced a “stay-at-home” order for the Buckeye state on March 22, stating the “new stage” reiterates all the guidelines he had been asking citizens to follow the “last few weeks.”

The order, which went into effect at 11:59 p.m. on March 23 and lasts until at least April 6, states:

  • All residents are ordered to work from home, except for essential personnel.
  • Residents may go to the grocery store, pharmacy, gas runs, and doctor appointments.
  • Limited exercise and visits to state parks are allowed, but everyone must follow social distancing guidelines.
  • All non-essential businesses are shut down.
  • Restaurants can still deliver to homes.
  • All roads remain open.
  • Grocery stores, pharmacies, and gas stations are open.
  • Daycares are limited to six children per room.

LOUISIANA

Louisiana Gov. John Bel Edwards issued a statewide “stay-at-home” order on March 22, stating that the “difficult decision” was made after the state confirmed 800 new cases in two weeks.

“We need to be resolute, focused, determined, and we need to beat this,” Edwards said during a press conference to announce the order. “We’re going to do it because we’re going to comply to these directives.”

The order, which will be effective until at least April 12, states:

  • All residents are ordered to work from home, except for essential personnel.
  • Residents may go to the grocery store, pharmacy, doctor appointments.
  • Limited exercise—such as bike rides, walks, and hikes—is allowed with social distancing precautions.
  • All non-essential businesses are shut down.
  • Restaurants are still open for delivery, takeout, and drive-through.
  • All roads remain open.
  • Grocery stores, pharmacies, and gas stations are open.

NEW JERSEY

New Jersey Gov. Phil Murphy on March 21 issued a statewide “stay-at-home” order and mandated all non-essential businesses to close.

“The order provides for certain exceptions, such as obtaining essential goods or services, seeking medical attention, visiting family or close friends, reporting to work, or engaging in outdoor activities,” the governor said in a statement.

The order went into effect on March 21 at 9 p.m. It prohibits “all gatherings of individuals, such as parties, celebrations, or other social events.”

The exceptions to the order include:

  • Grocery stores, farmer’s markets, other food suppliers, liquor stores.
  • Post offices, pet stores, gas stations, convenience stores.
  • Pharmacies and medical marijuana dispensaries.
  • Hardware and home improvement stores.
  • Banks and other financial institutions.
  • Laundromats, dry cleaning services.

MASSACHUSETTS

Gov. Charlie Baker issued a stay-at-home advisory on March 23 after his state reported 646 cases of the novel coronavirus.

“Everyone is advised to stay home and limit all unnecessary activities,” Baker said. “We’re asking everyone to use their common sense, think about the impact this virus is having on the sick and elderly, and to limit their interactions with other people. This cuts down on the chances this virus has to spread.”

The advisory, which went into effect March 24 at noon and lasts until at least April 7, states:

  • All residents are ordered to work from home, except for essential personnel.
  • Restaurants can remain open and offer takeout and delivery services.
  • Grocery stores, pharmacies, health care providers, and gas stations remain open.
  • Medical marijuana stores are considered essential and remain open, but recreational stores are closed.
  • Limited exercise in public parks is encouraged with adherence to social distancing guidelines.
  • Buses and trains continue to operate but should be used only for essential travel.

DELAWARE

Delaware Gov. John Carney issued a stay-at-home order on March 22, asking neighboring states to enact similar guidelines to effectively flatten the coronavirus curve. Violations of the new order could lead to criminal charges, according to his amended emergency declaration.

“We’re acting with urgency to prevent a spike in coronavirus cases that could overwhelm our hospital system,” Carney said.

Starting on Tuesday at 8 p.m., the order states:

  • All residents are expected to work from home, except for employees in essential jobs.
  • All non-essential businesses are shut down.
  • Residents may exercise outside but must adhere to social distancing.
  • Grocery stores, pharmacies, health care providers, and gas stations remain open.
  • Restaurants and bars remain open to offer takeout and delivery.

MICHIGAN

Michigan Gov. Gretchen Whitmer announced a statewide stay-at-home order on March 23, saying the drastic decision is “the most effective way we can slow down the virus.” Violations of the order could result in a misdemeanor.

“I know this will be hard, but it will be temporary. If we all come together, get serious, and do our part by staying home, we can stay safe and save lives,” Whitmer said in a Monday press conference.

The order, which took effect 12:01 a.m. on March 24, states:

  • All residents are expected to work from home, except for employees necessary to sustain and protect citizens.
  • All public and private gatherings of any number of people outside a single household are barred
  • All non-essential businesses are shut down.
  • Residents may go to the grocery store, pharmacy, gas station, and doctor appointments.
  • Exercise is encouraged, but all residents must adhere to social distancing guidelines.
  • Grocery stores, pharmacies, health care operations, law enforcement, banks, and gas stations remain open.
  • Restaurants can remain open, but only to provide carry-out or drive-through options.

WEST VIRGINIA

West Virginia Gov. Jim Justice announced a stay-at-home order on March 23 in order to continue to “slow the spread of COVID-19.”

The order, which began at 8 p.m. on March 24, states:

  • All residents are expected to work from home, except those who work in essential services.
  • All non-essential businesses are shut down.
  • Residents may go to the grocery store, pharmacy, warehouse store, and doctor appointments.
  • Restaurants remain open, but only to provide carry-out, delivery, or drive-through services.
  • Residents are not allowed to visit loved ones at the hospital, nursing homes, skilled nursing facilities, or other health care establishments.
  • All cabins and restrooms at state parks are closed.
  • Trails, golf courses, and state parks remain open for limited exercise—as long as residents keep at least six feet away from their neighbors.

CONNECTICUT

Connecticut Gov. Ned Lamont announced a statewide “stay safe, stay home” order that began on the evening of March 23 to encourage fewer in-person interactions among residents.

The order states:

  • All nonessential businesses are closed, and all residents work remotely.
  • Gatherings of more than 50 people are banned.
  • Bars and restaurants are open only for takeout and delivery.
  • All clubs, bars, movie theaters, nail salons, hair salons, and gyms are shut down.
  • All indoor shopping malls, amusement parks, and bowling alleys are closed.
  • Grocery stores, pharmacies, health care operations, and gas stations remain open.
  • Public transportation is open but only to be used when absolutely necessary.
  • Truckers, wastewater operators, and hotel and airport staff continue to go to work.
  • Hardware, liquor, and pet stores also remain open.

NEW JERSEY

New Jersey Gov. Phil Murphy announced March 21 that he would be ordering residents to stay at home. Violations for not following the executive order could result in a disorderly conduct charge—which brings with it a maximum sentence of 364 days in jail and a $1,000 fine.

“We need you to just stay at home,” Murphy said. “We have to change our behaviors.”

The order states:

  • No gatherings larger than 50 people.
  • All bars and restaurants are shut down, but take-out and delivery is allowed.
  • All bars, nightclubs, casinos, movie theaters, and gyms are shut down.
  • All indoor shopping malls, amusement parks, and bowling alleys are shut down.
  • All residents to stay home, except for those in essential services
  • State-wide curfew from 8 p.m. to 5 a.m.
  • Residents can go to the grocery store, doctor appointments, visit close family or a romantic partner.
  • Hospitals, grocery stores, pharmacies, pet stores, physical therapy offices, and liquor stores will remain open.

HAWAII

Hawaii Gov. David Ige issued a sweeping “stay-at-home" on March 23 in an effort to stop the spread of coronavirus in the islands.

“You should stay at home,” Ige said. “If you need to go to work, you should go to work. And when you’re done with work, you should come back home.”

The order, which goes into effect March 25 at 12:01 a.m. through April 30, states:

  • All people must stay at home except for “essential activities,” or to travel to and from “essential businesses.”
  • All places of public gathering closed.
  • Everyone must maintain a minimum of 6 feet of physical separation from others in businesses.
  • Businesses must have separate operating hours for high-risk populations.
  • All the malls and some hotels will close down.
  • Outdoor activities are allowed, but residents must practice social distancing.
  • Grocery stores, pharmacies, banks, pet stores, and all essential businesses will stay open.

VERMONT

Vermont Gov. Phil Scott issued a “stay home, stay safe” order on March 23, asking residents to limit activities outside in order to slow the spread of the deadly virus.

“We all must do our part to slow the spread of COVID-19 to minimize infections—particularly for those who are elderly or have underlying chronic health conditions—and prevent it from overwhelming our healthcare facilities,” Scott said in a statement announcing the order. “The more Vermonters who take this seriously and stay home, the faster we can return to normal.”

The order, which is set to begin March 25 at 5 p.m. until at least April 15, states:

  • All Vermonters are to stay home and work remotely, except for those who work for essential services.
  • All in-person, non-essential businesses to close.
  • Grocery stores, gas stations, critical manufacturing, pharmacies, and health care facilities to remain open.
  • Restaurants may continue to provide curbside and delivery services.
  • Outdoor activities, such as cross-country skiing and walking dogs, are encouraged within the social distancing guidelines.
  • Amtrak service suspended in the state.

INDIANA

Indian Gov. Eric Holcomb issued a stay-at-home order on March 23. While police are not yet allowed to enforce the order, Holcomb said the Indiana State Police will work with local law enforcement if the mandate is not being followed.

“The next two weeks are critical if we are to slow the spread of COVID-19, and we must slow the spread,” Holcomb said. “You must be part of the solution, not the problem.”

The order, which went into effect on March 25 and will last until at least April 7, states:

  • Essential employees, including health care workers, grocery and transit workers can leave their homes.
  • All other residents must stay home and work remotely.
  • Residents may leave their homes to exercise.
  • Trips to the grocery store, gas station, and pharmacies are allowed.
  • Restaurants and bars can continue to provide takeout and delivery.
  • Public transportation, ride-sharing, and taxis should only be used for essential travel.
  • Roads and state parks will remain open.

COLORADO

Colorado Gov. Jared Police issued a statewide “stay at home” order on March 25, backtracking on previous statements that he had hoped to avoid any orders that would force residents indoors.

“You need to stay home and do your part and I need to stay home and do my part,” said Polis. “We owe it to ourselves and our fellow Americans in order to save lives. This is the season for staying at home to save lives.”

This order, which will begin on March 26 and be in effect until at least April 11, states:

  • All residents must work from home, except for essential personnel.
  • Ski resorts, barbershops, and other non-essential businesses will close.
  • Limited travel outside is allowed, such as trips to the grocery store, pharmacy, and doctor appointments.
  • Restaurants will remain open, but only to provide takeout and delivery.
  • Walks and hikes are encouraged, as long as residents adhere to social distancing guidelines.

ALASKA

Alaska Gov. Mike Dunleavy on March 27 issued a stay-at-home order after one resident died from COVID-19 and another 20 people tested positive. While law enforcement will respond to complaints about residents not following the mandate, Dunleavy said that everyone is expected to self-police.

“We crossed a line today for Alaska,” Dunleavy said at a news conference.“The tightening of the mandates is due, in part, to the rising cases and trying to slow the spread so we have time to build up the health-care capacity.”

The mandate, which began March 28 and will be re-evaluated in the next two weeks, states:

  • All residents must work from home, except for essential personnel.
  • Grocery stores, banks, pharmacies, and gas stations will remain open.
  • Restaurants will remain open, but only to provide takeout and delivery.
  • Walks, snowshoeing, four-wheeling, and ice fishing are encouraged, as long as residents adhere to social distancing guidelines.
  • Roads are still open.

IDAHO

Idaho Gov. Brad Little issued a state-wide stay-home order on March 25, asking residents not to leave their homes and to try not to use public transportation unless they are obtaining essential supplies. Little said he activated the Idaho National Guard to “assist civil authorities and local jurisdictions.”

“Our healthcare and public safety workers are putting themselves in harm’s way to respond to the coronavirus emergency, and we owe it to them to do our part by following this statewide stay-home order,” Governor Little added. “We will get through this together as long as we all play an active part in fighting the spread of coronavirus. I am proud of Idaho and the way we support and love our neighbors.”

The mandate, which will remain in effect for at least 21 days, states:

  • Essential employees, including health-care workers, grocery, and transit workers can leave their homes and use public transportation.
  • All other residents must stay home and work remotely and limit public transportation usage.
  • Residents may leave their homes to exercise or retrieve essential supplies like food, pharmaceuticals, or visit the doctor.
  • Restaurants and bars can continue to provide takeout and delivery.
  • Roads will remain open.

KANSAS

Kansas Gov. Laura Kelly issued a stay-at-home order on March 29, a “difficult and unavoidable” decision that will still allow residents to continue to go to religious services and buy, sell, and manufacture firearms. Kelly added she is relying on residents to follow the order without the need for law enforcement because she does not want a “martial law state.”

“You can leave your house. You can still go outside. You are not under house arrest,” Kelly said.

The measure, which is scheduled to be in place until at least April 19, states:

  • All other residents must stay home and work remotely, except for those in essential services.
  • Residents may go to grocery stores, pharmacies, and doctors’ appointments.
  • Gatherings of more than 10 people are prohibited.
  • Religious gatherings are allowed but should follow social distancing guidelines.
  • Sells and makers of firearms and ammunition are excluded.
  • Restaurants and bars can continue to provide takeout and delivery.
  • Roads will remain open.

NEW MEXICO

New Mexico Gov. Michelle Lujan Grisham instituted a “statewide stay-at-home instruction” on March 23, stating that while life must “continue to operate,” it must be done in an “extremely limited way.”

“The only way for us to stop the spread of this virus is for New Mexicans to stop interacting with each other,” Grisham said. “New Mexicans must be crystal-clear on this point: Right now, every time you leave your house, you are putting yourself, your family and your community at risk. Only by distancing from one another, by remaining home except for essential or emergency travel, can we limit the spread of this virus to the point that it does not overwhelm New Mexico.”

The order states:

  • All non-essential workers must work from home.
  • All non-essential businesses will close.
  • Limited travel outside is allowed, such as trips to the grocery store, pharmacy, and doctor appointments.
  • Gatherings of more than five people are prohibited.
  • Restaurants will remain open, but only to provide takeout and delivery.
  • Walking, hiking and biking is encouraged, as long as residents adhere to social distancing guidelines.

MARYLAND

Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan ordered a stay-at-home directive on March 23 after the state confirmed more than 1,400 COVID-19 cases. Violators can be punished with a misdemeanor charge and could be imprisoned up to a year, face a fine up to $5,000, or both.

“We are no longer asking or suggesting that Marylanders stay home. We are directing them to do so,” Hogan said.

The order, which will go into effect at 8 p.m. March 23, states:

  • All residents must work from home, except for essential personnel.
  • All non-essential businesses will close.
  • Essential businesses must limit contact between customers and staff.
  • Limited travel outside is allowed, such as trips to the grocery store, pharmacy, and doctor appointments.
  • Gatherings, including religious services, of more than 10 people are prohibited.
  • Restaurants will remain open, but only to provide takeout and delivery.
  • Walking, hiking and biking is encouraged, as long as residents adhere to social distancing guidelines.

VIRGINIA

Virginia Gov. Ralph Northam issued a stay-at-home order on March 30 after beaches and other recreational areas were “literally packed” over the weekend as the virus continues to plague the nation. Violators of the order will face a Class 1 misdemeanor, an offense punishable by up to 12 months in jail, a fine of up to $2,500, or both.

“You are being very, very selfish because you are putting all of us, especially our health care providers at risk,” Northam said on Monday, addressing those who previously defied his suggestion to stay home amid the pandemic.”

The order, which will be in effect until June 10, states:

  • All non-essential workers are ordered to work from home.
  • Employees in essential jobs and government personnel will continue to go to work.
  • Limited outdoor exercise is permitted, as long as residents adhere to social distancing guidelines.
  • Residents are allowed to go to the grocery store and run errands.
  • Restaurants and bars can still provide takeout and delivery options.
  • All non-essential businesses statewide must close their premises.
  • Private campgrounds must close for short-term stays.
  • Beaches will be closed statewide, except for fishing and limited exercise.
  • Mass transit and roadways are not affected.

TENNESSEE

Tennessee Gov. Bill Lee issued a two-week statewide executive order on April 2 mandating residents stay at home unless carrying out essential activities after several mayors in the state enacted similar restrictions. Lee previously said he would not enact such because he saw it as infringing on citizens’ personal liberties, though he did say Tennesseans would be “safer at home.”

The order, which will began April 2 and will last until at least April 14, states:

  • Residents that do not work in essential fields are ordered to work from home.
  • Limited outdoor exercise is permitted, as long as residents adhere to social distancing guidelines.
  • Residents are allowed to go to the grocery store and run errands.
  • Restaurants and bars can still provide takeout and delivery options.
  • All non-essential businesses statewide must close their premises.

FLORIDA

Governor Ron DeSantis on April 1 announced a “stay-at-home” order, despite originally resisting the stringent measure. After pressure from local political leaders, the Republic governor said Wednesday he decided to enact the order after President Donald Trump extended national social distancing guidelines for another month.

“We don’t know how all these measures are going to work,” DeSantis said at a press conference announcing the order. “But we’ll figure out on the back end how this will work out.”

The order, which will come into effect at midnight on April 2, will continue for at least 30 days. It states:

  • Residents are to stay home and work remotely.
  • Employees in essential jobs and government personnel will continue to go to work.
  • Limited outdoor exercise is permitted, as long as residents adhere to social distancing guidelines.
  • Residents are allowed to go to the grocery store, pet stores, pharmacies, doctor's appointments, gas stations, and the bank.
  • Restaurants and bars can still provide takeout and delivery options.
  • All non-essential businesses statewide must close their premises.
  • Roadways are not affected.

MINNESOTA

  • All bars and restaurants are shut down but take out and delivery is allowed.
  • All bars, nightclubs, casinos, movie theaters, gyms, community clubs to shut.
  • Grocery store workers are classified as emergency personnel, allowing them to access free state child care.

PENNSYLVANIA

Pennsylvania Gov. Tom Wolf on April 2 issued a stay at home order, calling the measure the “the most prudent option” after initially only implementing restrictions for non-essential businesses to close down.

“We appreciate the shared sacrifice of all 12.8 million Pennsylvanians; we are in this together,” Wolf said in a statement.

The order, which will last until at least April 30, states:

  • All businesses not considered “life-sustaining” will be closed and all residents will work remotely.
  • Grocery stores, gas stations, banks, health care providers, and social assistance services still open.
  • Restaurants can only offer take out, delivery, and drive-through services.
  • Residents may go to essential businesses and go outside for limited exercise.
  • Schools are closed until further notice.
  • International students, foster youth, and other students who need housing may remain in campus housing.
  • Roads and public transportation will remain open.

MISSISSIPPI

Mississippi Gov. Tate Reeves ordered a “stay-at-home” order April 1, after resisting pressure for weeks to require residents to remain indoors.

“This will not be easy for anyone, but we believe it is right. We know that there are many people who are scared, wondering what this means for their wages and their ability to put food on the table,” Reeves said on April 1. “We are here for you and working hard to help. Mississippi will not allow you to fall without a hand to help you back up.”

The order, which will go into effect April 3, states:

  • All residents will work remotely unless it’s an essential business.
  • Grocery stores, gas stations, banks, health care providers, and social assistance services will remain open.
  • Restaurants can only offer take out, delivery, and drive-through services.
  • All non-essential businesses will close.
  • Groups of more than 10 individuals are prohibited.
  • Residents may go outside for limited exercise but must follow social distancing guidelines.
  • Evictions are suspended, though tenants are still required to pay any rent or mortgage payments.

GEORGIA

Georgia Gov. Brian Kemp announced a state-wide stay-at-home order on April 2, a move that will close all public schools in the state for the rest of the academic year. While initially resistant about a stay-at-home order, Kent said Wednesday he was triggered by the “game-changing” projections from the White House task force about the extent the disease will spread.

“I want to encourage my fellow Georgians to hang in there. I know you’re tired of this,” Kemp said on Wednesday. “But we must first overcome the obstacles in our path.”

The order, which will go into effect on April 3 until at least April 30, states:

  • All residents will work remotely unless they’re in an essential business.
  • All non-essential businesses will close.
  • Grocery stores, gas stations, banks, health care providers, and social assistance services still open.
  • Restaurants can only offer take out, delivery, and drive-through services.
  • Residents may go outside for limited exercise.
  • All public schools are closed for the rest of the academic school year.
  • Roads and public transportation will remain open.

WASHINGTON STATE

Washington Gov. Jay Inslee ordered a statewide emergency shutdown on March 15—the first state to force Americans indoors and the state with the most national deaths due to the coronavirus.

The order states:

  • All restaurants and bars are shut down but can still provide takeout and delivery.
  • No gatherings over 50 people.
  • Grocery stores and pharmacies are exempt from the ban.

Read more: www.thedailybeast.com

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